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Books as Bodies and as Sacred Beings

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In this volume, an international team of scholars addresses the theme of books as sacred beings. On the basis of an impressively diverse range of primary material and perspectives, the essays meld to engage and advance previous research by solidifying the conclusion that human cultures, especially religious groups, often ritualize bodies as sacred books and books as divine beings. These studies show the wide variety of ways in which books, bodies and beings intermingle in material sacred texts manipulated by human bodies and also in transcendent textual bodies. When describing how people use books, the boundary between material immanence and spiritual transcendence turns out to be very thin indeed. The chapters are bracketed by an introduction to the collection and by a concluding essay that extrapolates on the general theme of books as sacred beings.

Published: Jun 30, 2021

Series


Section Chapter Authors
Chapter 1
Introduction James Watts
Chapter 2
Performing Scriptures: Ritualizing Written Texts in Seolwi-seolgyeong, the Korean Shamanistic Recitation of Scriptures Yohan Yoo
Chapter 3
Embodying the Qu’ran Katharina Wilkens
Chapter 4
Sacred Texts and the Digital Turn: Reflections on Scriptures as Material Objects in a Liminal Age Bradford Anderson
Chapter 5
Being the Bible: Sacred Bodies and Iconic Books in Bring Your Bible to School Day Dorina Parmenter
Chapter 6
Body Building in the Hindu Tantric Tradition: The Advantages and Confusions of Scriptural Entextualization in the Worship of the Goddess Kali Rachel McDermott
Chapter 7
Saints’ Lives as Performance Art Virginia Burrus
Chapter 8
Aspiring Narratives of Previous Births: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Written and Visual Media in Ancient Gandhara Jason Neelis
Chapter 9
Daoist Writs and Scriptures as Sacred Beings: With a Focus on Cosmological Meaning Jihyun Kim
Chapter 10
Books as Sacred Beings James Watts

Reviews

This collection challenges readers to think more expansively and daringly about books/texts and what beyond content-meanings they are about or, in my view of things, are made to mean or do. Such phenomenological interests are important in terms of making the attempt to fathom as widely and as deeply as possible the ongoing dynamics and effects of human-making. The volume will be of interest to scholars working in areas having to do with the history and theory and problematics of reading, of books, of embodiment and dynamics of sacralization.
Vincent L. Wimbush, Ph.D., Director, Institute for Signifying Scriptures